Government Wins Protection for 33.8 Million Drivers in Largest Product Recall in U.S. History

Imagine you’re hit from behind while driving. Your vehicles airbags deploy, but instead of cushioning you, bits of metal shrapnel are sent flying. That’s what has happened to more than 100 drivers since 2007.

Six deaths and more than 100 injuries have been attributed to defects in the small component that inflates the airbag. It seems humidity degrades the casing around the chemicals, causing the inflator to sometimes explode. The components’ Japanese manufacturer, Takata, has been slow to accept responsibility for this defective product.

read in full

The Public Wants EPA – Not Congress – to Protect Our Drinking Water

A nationwide poll by Hart Research Associates found that Americans overwhelmingly support the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Water Rule. The rule will clarify what waters EPA can protect under the Clean Water Act.

For over 40 years, EPA has protected our surface waters from industrial pollution through the Clean Water Act.

read in full

Banning Fracking Bans: The Paradox of Local Control

There is a new paradox emerging in the fracking debate.  

The oil and gas industry firmly opposes federal fracking standards, claiming that states know best how to govern their own lands. States are currently responsible for the majority of industry oversight, and rules can vary significantly among them.

read in full

Boosting Energy Efficiency Can Combat Climate Change and Protect Our Health

Cutting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants will help combat climate change, but it can also substantially reduce illnesses and deaths from other types of air pollution. Scientists from Syracuse, Harvard, and Boston universities compared the health impacts of three alternative policies related to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed carbon standards for existing power plants, and they found that increasing energy efficiency would be one of the most effective ways to cut power plant emissions and protect our health.

read in full

In Wyoming, Reporting Environmental Damage Could Land You in Prison

Concerned Wyoming residents who want to protect their state’s beautiful natural resources and keep their families safe from harmful contaminants have been silenced.

Earlier this year, the Wyoming legislature passed a bill making it a crime for citizens to collect information about the environment and report concerns to their state or federal government.

read in full

UPDATE: Putting Profits Before People is the Real Tragedy

UPDATE (5/15/2015): Amtrak announced yesterday that it would have Positive Train Control up and operating on its heavily traveled Northeast Corridor routes before the end of the year. Amtrak officials also told members of Congress that Positive Train Control has been installed in the area of Tuesday's crash, but it was still undergoing testing and had not yet been activated. 

###

read in full

We Can Prevent Health Problems from Air Pollution by Strengthening Standards and Stopping Budget Cuts

"My asthma is highly reactive to ozone. On days like this I can hardly walk across the room. My quality of life is trashed by ozone." This is just one of hundreds of personal stories about the devastating health impacts of air pollution that are posted on the American Lung Association’s State of the Air website.  

read in full

Ten Years after Toxic Chemical Settlement, DuPont Failing to Keep Its Promises

In 1938, a DuPont chemist accidently created a chemical compound that would make thousands of products water- and stain-resistant. The compound belongs to a family of chemicals known as perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). PFCs soon made their way into nonstick cookware, carpeting, food packaging, and a host of other products.  

read in full

Procter & Gamble Receives an “F” in Chemical Transparency

“Eco-friendly.” “Healthy.” “Responsible.” These are just a few of the labels used on household cleaning products to make them appear safe for consumers. But no one oversees how these terms are used or what they really mean. This becomes readily apparent when you scrutinize the ingredients on cleaning product labels to try to determine how safe and "green" they really are. One company – Procter & Gamble – is so bad at disclosing useful chemical information to consumers that it recently received an "F" from a national environmental health group.

read in full

If You Thought Corporate Personhood Was Bad, Wait Until You See Corporate Nationhood in the New Trade Treaty

The government of El Salvador was so concerned that its water was so fouled by mining companies that it passed a moratorium on new mines in 2008. Oceana Gold, an Australian corporation, didn’t like the law, so it sued El Salvador for $301 million, the amount the company said the policy cost it in lost profits.

read in full