CEG's Scott Klinger on Los Angeles Public Radio

CEG’s Scott Klinger talks with Los Angeles Public Radio’s Ian Masters about the effect of the dramatic stock market decline on Americans’ retirement security. The pair discuss ways the government could create retirement options that would allow workers invest in rebuilding America’s crumbling infrastructure, as an alternative to using our retirement dollars to fatten Wall Street’s profits and power.

 

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Student Debt Matters to All of Us

A college degree is arguably the best investment a young person can make in his or her economic future.  A university education is associated with higher lifetime earnings, and lower risk of unemployment.

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Now You Can Yelp Your Favorite Federal Agency

Under a new agreement with Yelp— a website that allows people to locate and review local businesses— federal agencies will now be able to claim existing Yelp pages that already bear their name or create new pages. Since Yelp already maintained pages on federal agencies where citizens could rate them, this change will allow federal agencies to respond to citizen queries and complaints and engage with people across the country.

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Five Laws That Made America a Better Place: What Congress Accomplished in 1965 Puts Today’s Lawmakers to Shame.

Our country has no shortage of big problems. While big challenges are nothing new for Americans, how we deal with them has changed.

Fifty years ago, rising social unrest forced Congress to deal with big things — like voting rights, immigration, and access to health care and education. Over a seven-month period in 1965, Congress passed five significant laws that dealt with these pressing issues of the day. These laws forever changed life in America.

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Meet You in the Pitchfork Aisle?

Businessman Peter Georgescu issued a clarion call for capitalists to respond to the growing crisis of economic inequality in an op-ed entitled “Capitalists, Arise” in the Aug 9 edition of the Sunday New York Times.

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Voting Rights: The Struggle Continues

Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, which many consider the most important civil rights legislation of the 1960s. The law gave the federal government oversight responsibility over elections in all or part of 15 states (including parts of New York, Michigan, and California) where there had been systemic exclusion of voters based on race, ethnicity, or economic status. Under the Voting Rights Act, states had to pre-clear any changes to voter eligibility rules or election conduct prior to implementing these changes.

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Medicare: Protecting Seniors for 50 Years

Fifty years ago, the United States created the Medicare insurance program – which has significantly increased the affordability of health care for America’s seniors, as well as those with certain disabilities and medical conditions.

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Happy Birthday, NASA! We’re Celebrating the Thousands of Ways NASA Has Improved Our Lives.

One of my earliest childhood memories is of our mailman, Mr. Harmon, taking a break from his daily deliveries and joining my Mom and me to watch some of the early space launches. I didn’t know it at the time, but the influence of government filled my family’s living room – from the presence of our caring letter carrier to the visionary work of NASA scientists exploring the world far beyond Earth.

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Udderly Ridiculous: U.S. Trade Negotiators Try to Milk Dairy Concessions from Canadians

With the president successfully wrangling “fast track” negotiating authority for the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement, U.S.

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Throwing a Wrench in the Revolving Door

Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) and Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) recently introduced the Financial Services Conflict of Interest Act, which takes aim at the "revolving door." This term refers to people who move from the private sector, to public agencies or Capitol Hill offices, and back to private companies, often bringing undue corporate influence along for the ride. Sens.

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