Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement Resources

The safety standards on which we rely daily for our food, medicines and cars. The energy and climate policies needed to save our planet. The new financial regulations designed to prevent banks from gambling with our money and creating another crisis. These are policies that should be determined in open, democratic venues where we have a say. But a group of the largest U.S. and European banks and corporations want to rewrite these safeguards behind closed doors. For over a decade, they have pushed for a new U.S. "trade" deal with Europe – the Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA), which corporate proponents have tried to rebrand as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) – a deal that would roll back consumer protections on both sides of the Atlantic.

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UPDATED: Fast Track Authority on Trade Agreements Faces Dead End in Congress

UPDATE (01/31/2014):  Opposition to legislation that would grant the president trade promotion authority has escalated since the Camp-Baucus bill was introduced. On Jan. 27, 564 organizations, including Center for Effective Government, sent a letter to members of Congress asking them to reject the Camp-Baucus bill and seek a new form of trade authority.

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Exports of U.S. Natural Gas May Present Risks From Receiving Countries

On Oct. 10, the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power convened a panel of ambassadors and energy and trade ministers from Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean to discuss the geopolitical implications of the U.S. expanding its export capabilities for liquefied natural gas (LNG).  The delegates primarily highlighted potential economic benefits to receiving nations, such as increased competition in the market and security of supply, and spoke little of the risks that LNG operations pose to human health and the environment.

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State Toxic Chemical Regulations at Risk in Upcoming Trade Negotiations

On Oct. 7, the United States and European Union will resume negotiations that began earlier this year over the Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA).  Since tariffs and quotas between the U.S. and EU are already quite low, the negotiations will focus primarily on reducing “non-tariff barriers” (such as differences in standards and regulations) to expand trade across the Atlantic.

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