Outdoor Air Pollution Identified As Major Cause of Lung Cancer

In a groundbreaking Oct. 17 announcement, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an agency of the World Health Organization, classified outdoor air pollution as a known cause of lung cancer.

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Even More Health and Safety Impacts of the Government Shutdown: Why You Should Care

Because the scope of health and safety protections provided by the federal government is vast, it’s easy to not fully appreciate the impacts of a government shutdown on our daily lives. Early into the current shutdown, I blogged about some of the less obvious potential health and safety impacts that could be affected by lack of government oversight. An Oct.

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Three Dangerous Myths About the Debt Ceiling

You’ve all heard by now that the U.S. will reach its borrowing limit (aka the dreaded debt ceiling) on or around October 17th. While there’s nothing we enjoy more than writing about the debt ceiling over and over again, let’s skip the backstory and dive into some dangerous debt ceiling myths.

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New California Regulations Lead the Way In Protecting Consumers From Toxic Chemicals

The nation's federal toxic chemicals law, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), has a number of significant shortcomings. Among other things, it does not generally require companies to test chemicals for possible health effects before using them in consumer products.

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More Health and Safety Impacts of the Government Shutdown

I blogged last week before the federal government shutdown started about potential health and safety ramifications that could result should the shutdown occur. Now that the shutdown is a reality, it’s important to consider some of the health and safety concerns that may be less than obvious.

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State Toxic Chemical Regulations at Risk in Upcoming Trade Negotiations

On Oct. 7, the United States and European Union will resume negotiations that began earlier this year over the Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA).  Since tariffs and quotas between the U.S. and EU are already quite low, the negotiations will focus primarily on reducing “non-tariff barriers” (such as differences in standards and regulations) to expand trade across the Atlantic.

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Government Shutdown Would Compromise Worker and Public Health

As we creep ever closer to the prospect of a federal government shutdown due to the efforts by some conservative members of Congress to defund the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and attack implementation of our nation’s public health laws, it’s important to understand how a shutdown will impact the health and safety of workers and the public’s health.

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EPA Announces Limits on New Power Plant Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today issued its long-awaited proposed rule limiting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from new power plants. Carbon dioxide is the primary greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming linked to climate changes over the past several decades and has resulted in increasing severity and frequency of storms and droughts, as well as rising sea levels and other environmental effects.

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House Attack on Major Health Standards Likely Linked to Debt Ceiling Negotiations

With a contentious political fight brewing in Congress over the debt ceiling, Republican members of the House have indicated they are considering several “riders,” or supplemental legislative language, that would significantly limit the government’s ability to set standards that are essential for protecting public health and welfare.

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Labor Department Announces Long-Awaited Home Care Workers Rule

The Department of Labor (DOL) announced a final rule on Sept. 17 to increase the wage protections afforded to home care workers. The rule, first proposed nearly two years ago, will bring more domestic service workers under the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) minimum wage and overtime provisions.

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